The Shelter Blog has been inactive since May, 2019. Too much to do! From this point on, Lloyd’s Blog will have the buildings, vehicles, and home-related posts such as what has previously appeared here. Go to lloydkahn.com.

Off the Grid (119)

Canadian Home in Our Book Inspires Home in Tasmania

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My name is Pete Robey and my wife Blythe and I live in Tasmania. The little island attached to the bottom of Australia. Thought I would share with you that our house is the first approved cordwood home in Australia. It is currently featured in Australia’s Owner Builder magazine. You can get a link here at the bottom of the page: www.thehousethatworkedout.com 

I bought your 3 books: Shelter, Builders of the Pacific Coast, and Home Work early on before we had even confirmed style. The Baird House from page 28–31 of Builders of the Pacific Coast just grabbed me. Thanks Mike Baird and to you too Lloyd (House) for this inspiration. We designed our home with the same ideal: every room and every area of the home can pretty much engage with every other area of the home. The village TeePee idea. We have a massive 4 ft. diameter, 2  ft. long tree holding up the earth roof and our 2nd story doesn’t go all the way to the middle so we have plenty of space. We don’t have stairs, preferring to use a gym rope as exercise — see this post from our blog: ‌www.thehousethatworkedout.com/…

Catch you later.
–Pete

From www.lloydkahn.com/…

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House Truck in Bolinas

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John’s house truck was featured earlier this year when Tiny House – Giant Journey came across John and his house truck in southern CA. My friend Jesse who lives on the Mendocino coast had photographed him the other week and told me John and his truck were coming my way. Here are a few pics of the exterior while he was in Bolinas (was not able to get inside at the time.)
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Tiny Home on the Water in Maine



Americans have historically measured success in square feet. A big house was something to work for. But a growing number of Mainers are choosing to drastically cut their living space — on purpose. They’re part of what’s known as the “tiny home” movement, and they’re living in spaces of 500 to 600 square feet, or less. Why do they do it? We sent Sara Gatcomb to find out.

news.mpbn.net/…

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Welsh "Hobbit House" Faces Demolition

Welsh Hobbit House

Sent to us by Conor McBrierty :

A young family is making a last-ditch effort to save its cherished “hobbit house” from the bulldozers after planners deemed it had to be razed.

Charlie Hague and Megan Williams used natural materials to lovingly build their roundhouse tucked away in southwest Wales. But the pair, both 27, applied for planning permission only after moving in with their newborn son, Eli, in 2012.

Though many local people did not even know the small building was there, planners ruled the house did not fit in with the surrounding Pembrokeshire countryside and decided it had to go.

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Magical Hobbit-Like Eco Cave House

Underhill is an incredible hobbit-home eco-cave house built into a hillside. The off-the-grid house is cleverly constructed to resemble a cave. With no electricity in the house, the stone, wood and rustic features truly make you feel like you’re stepping back in time.

For more information on this house, visit www.livingbiginatinyhouse.com.

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Laura & Matt's 120 sq. ft. Tiny House in Asheville, NC

“…They live and work in this 120 sq. ft. cabin in the mountains of Asheville. Inside you’ll find a storage loft, sleeping loft, open living/dining area, bathroom with composting toilet and manual pump shower, and a kitchen…”

Article at www.tinyhousetalk.com/laura-matts-120-sq-ft-tiny-house-asheville-nc
Video by www.tinyhousegiantjourney.com

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Texas Professor Living in Dumpster

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An Austin professor has spent the better part of 2014 living minimally in a space that’s not as trashy as it sounds: a dumpster. The Dumpster Project — an ongoing project spearheaded by Jeffrey Wilson, an associate professor of biological sciences and dean of the University College at Huston-Tillotson University in Austin — aims to see how humans can live in a comfortable but environmentally sustainable fashion. “If you think about just moving to a smaller space and having less stuff, it creates some voids or spaces in your life that you can fill up with more meaningful stuff, meaningful experiences,” said Wilson, who has been nicknamed “Professor Dumpster”…

Sent to us by Ed Forgotson

Article at www.mysanantonio.com/…

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