The Shelter Blog has been inactive since May, 2019. Too much to do! From this point on, Lloyd’s Blog will have the buildings, vehicles, and home-related posts such as what has previously appeared here. Go to lloydkahn.com.

Living Roof (10)

Earth Dome by SunRay Kelley and Sierra Sander-Hewitt

earthdome

From August to October of 2015, I worked with a team of five people to build a 200 sq. ft. off-the-grid earth dome in the forest of Northwest Washington. The structure was designed by SunRay Kelley and built for our client Ranger. The building of the dome was filmed by Sharp Entertainment and the episode, Building off the Grid: Mudmen aired on DIY Network on January 19, 2016…

Post a comment (5 comments)

Canadian Home in Our Book Inspires Home in Tasmania

PeterRobey_Homework

My name is Pete Robey and my wife Blythe and I live in Tasmania. The little island attached to the bottom of Australia. Thought I would share with you that our house is the first approved cordwood home in Australia. It is currently featured in Australia’s Owner Builder magazine. You can get a link here at the bottom of the page: www.thehousethatworkedout.com 

I bought your 3 books: Shelter, Builders of the Pacific Coast, and Home Work early on before we had even confirmed style. The Baird House from page 28–31 of Builders of the Pacific Coast just grabbed me. Thanks Mike Baird and to you too Lloyd (House) for this inspiration. We designed our home with the same ideal: every room and every area of the home can pretty much engage with every other area of the home. The village TeePee idea. We have a massive 4 ft. diameter, 2  ft. long tree holding up the earth roof and our 2nd story doesn’t go all the way to the middle so we have plenty of space. We don’t have stairs, preferring to use a gym rope as exercise — see this post from our blog: ‌www.thehousethatworkedout.com/…

Catch you later.
–Pete

From www.lloydkahn.com/…

Post a comment

Welsh "Hobbit House" Faces Demolition

Welsh Hobbit House

Sent to us by Conor McBrierty :

A young family is making a last-ditch effort to save its cherished “hobbit house” from the bulldozers after planners deemed it had to be razed.

Charlie Hague and Megan Williams used natural materials to lovingly build their roundhouse tucked away in southwest Wales. But the pair, both 27, applied for planning permission only after moving in with their newborn son, Eli, in 2012.

Though many local people did not even know the small building was there, planners ruled the house did not fit in with the surrounding Pembrokeshire countryside and decided it had to go.

Read More …

Post a comment (7 comments)

Magical Hobbit-Like Eco Cave House

Underhill is an incredible hobbit-home eco-cave house built into a hillside. The off-the-grid house is cleverly constructed to resemble a cave. With no electricity in the house, the stone, wood and rustic features truly make you feel like you’re stepping back in time.

For more information on this house, visit www.livingbiginatinyhouse.com.

Post a comment

My First Building Project

AA-02-lo-res

In 1961, a surfing friend, John Stonum, was studying to be an architect at UC Berkeley, and designed this small building for me to build in Mill Valley, California. I wanted to build a sod roof (now called “living roof”), and we had journeyed up to the Heritage House on the Mendocino Coast to see their two sod-roofed cabins.

This was a post-and-beam structure, with posts 6 feet on centers, and oversized precast concrete piers for the foundation. A lumberyard in nearby Olema, California was going out of business and I bought a truckload of “merch” grade rough redwood two-by-fours for $35 a 1000. Not $350, but $35.
Read More …

Post a comment (3 comments)

Beautifully Renovated Shed in London

httpst.houzz_.comsimgs627166d6043d878f_4-8550rustic.jpg httpst.houzz_.comsimgs6be1b586043d89b2_4-9098rustic.jpg

Although we featured this shed earlier this year, here is an article with more information and better pics.

Carpenter, painter, musician and sculptor Joel Bird started working on his garden shed four years ago. “It was like an experiment, really,” Bird says. He’d finished renovating the house he’d bought in Tottenham, north London, and he wanted to create a serene and functional workspace in which he could produce music and paint. In addition to a workspace, he also wanted a garden, so he designed his shed with a garden on the roof. Over the past four years, the roof garden has become more and more elaborate, with a raised bed for vegetables, solar panels and an efficient drainage system. Read More …

Post a comment (1 comment)

Straw Bale and Timber Frame Home

04-strawtron

Hi Lloyd and Co.:

Saw your call for responses to the upcoming Small Homes book. Exciting! I think our straw bale & timber frame home fits squarely into that category. It’s actually around 440 sq. feet of interior heated space, but with the porch and balcony it’s a bit bigger.

15016408354_bd76ef81d5_c 08-strawtron 30-strawtron Read More …

Post a comment (1 comment)

How to Build a Reciprocal Roof Frame

reciprocal frame roof

In Tiny Homes, we did two pages (pp. 110-111) on Ziggy Liloia’s cob cottage. In this excerpt from his website, TheYearOfMud.com, he explains how he built his reciprocal framed roof.

ziggy-gobcobatron-01A reciprocal roof is a beautiful and simple self-supporting structure that can be composed of as few as three rafters, and up to any imaginable quantity (within reason, of course). Reciprocal roofs require no center support, they are quick to construct, and they can be built using round poles or dimensional lumber (perhaps with some creative notching). They are extremely strong, perfect for round buildings, and very appropriate for living roofs, as well. The reciprocal roof design was developed by Graham Brown in 1987. Read More …

Post a comment (1 comment)

Massey Burke's Cob Cabins in Mendocino

Interior wall

We featured these cabins about a month ago and have repeatedly had requests for some more photos including interior shots. Here are some more shots as well as some info on the builder.

Massey Burke is a designer, builder, and advocate for natural building.

She has also taught natural building and design with various educational institutions, including the University of San Francisco, Swarthmore College, and the Solar Living Institute. Other current projects include permitting a load-bearing cob studio in Berkeley and a natural remodel in El Sobrante. Current work can be found at masseyburke.carbonmade.com.
Read More …

Post a comment
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!