Builders of the Pacific Coast Book (46)

Listen to Lloyd on Tangentially Speaking Podcast with Chris Ryan

We recently had Dr. Chris Ryan over to record an episode of Chris’ podcast Tangentially Speaking. Click the iTunes link below to hear Lloyd discuss his life, what got him into building, publishing books, and what’s up next for Shelter Publications.

Chris Ryan is an author, podcaster, world traveler, and an all-around amazing guy. Check out his bestselling book Sex at Dawn; look for his next book coming out next year called Civilized to Death.

Post a comment (1 comment)

Margaret's Cabin Built by Jan Janzen

This little cabin was built almost entirely from a cedar tree that had been lying nearby. Framing, flooring, shakes. Maybe that’s what makes the building so harmonious. Jan had told me this and, as I was climbing around inside and out shooting photos, I had a vision of a tree, a solid chunk of wood, cut up rearranged, and expanded to make this cozy place…

Read More …

Post a comment (1 comment)

Boathouse Built by Dean Ellis

This is a graceful little steel-framed boathouse that Dean built on the beach. Posts are 4″-5″ square steel, 8′ on center. The steel purlins are 2½″ steel tubes. The 1″×6″ sheathing is welded to the steel purlins with nails. Photo by @lloyd.kahn

Post a comment (3 comments)

Lloyd House's Leaf House

…It seemed like a light roof was needed to compensate for the heaviness of the forest. Built the roof first; then the floor, and last the walls. To me roofs have become umbrellas that say anything can happen under them. When the roof is finished, you can stand it — feel the space, be in touch with the house — love it…

Post a comment (2 comments)

Island Cabins Built by Bruno Atkey and Wayne

In the early 90s, Bruno and Wayne built a number of houses on a small flat island off the Pacific Coast. They had to go out every day from the mainland, anchor their boat, and somehow get on the island. Wood came via helicopter and on barges from the mainland. All of the wood came color-coated for assembly. “We flew enough wood in for two houses in less than three hours.”…

Post a comment (1 comment)

Long House by Bruno Atkey

Bruno built this 30′×50′ building on a remote beach belonging to the Hesquiat tribe in British Columbia in 1999. It’s used in a “rediscovery” program, and now run by Hooksum Outdoor School, which educates young First Nations people about their history and heritage.

The entire building was framed with beach­combed logs — posts, beams, and purlins. Roofing is 3′-long split-cedar shakes; siding is also split cedar — 1×12’s and 1×15’s six to twelve feet long(!). His crew was mostly from the Hesquiat tribe…

Post a comment (1 comment)

Sauna at Louie Frazier's in Mendocino

After losing two saunas to high river water, Louie built this one on a one-ton Toyota truck frame. A pickup plus a few people haul it back from the river in the winter, with Donna steering the front wheels from the inside of the sauna. Woodstove built from 50-gallon drum gets fed from the outside…

Post a comment

Small Woodland Home in Southwest England

Dear Lloyd,

I became a carpenter and eco builder because of your books. Shelter and HomeWork got me hooked. Builders of the Pacific Coast got me started.

I used to work in an office. Now I build homes (narrowboats, vans, caravans, yurts, cabins) for the customers that want something different but can’t afford hiring “big people.” The poor also have the right to live in a nice home.

I built this 6.5m-diameter, heptagonal, tapered-walled, reciprocal green-roofed yurt, the “reciproyurt,” last year and got more than 70 volunteers involved.

I love working with people without experience. They give any project a freshness that you never get with professionals. They have no real preconceptions — really open-minded. They want to learn but they also teach you so much! They mainly helped with big jobs like raising the frame.

–Jesus Sierra

Post a comment (1 comment)
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!